Tag: Joe Ollmann

Comics for Grownups Episode 18

by on Jun.24, 2013, under Comics

Comics for Grownups Episode 18 with Alex Rothman is now available on iTunes. Direct RSS link for Android users here. In this episode we talk about:

Raw Power #1 and 2 by Josh Bayer

Today Is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life by Ulli Lust

Study Group Magazine #2

Science Fiction by Joe Ollmann

Tiny Pencil: The Forest Issue

Domovoi by Peter Bergting

Where Eden Once Stood: Veteran Stories from Iraq and Afghanistan by Jess Ruliffson

Primates: The Fearless Science of Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, and Biruté Galdikas by Jim Ottaviani and Maris Wicks

A User’s Guide to Neglectful Parenting by Guy Delisle

Plus the sad passing of Kim Thompson.

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Mid-Life

by on Oct.04, 2011, under Comics

Joe Ollmann’s Mid-Life feels like a throwback to the alternative comics of fifteen years ago, the ones whose loss I was mourning in my last review. Cramped, functional art designed to pack as much day-to-day detail of its story into each identically gridded page, based around an unlikeable everyman protagonist who feels like the author’s disgusted vision of himself, and a meandering plot.

Of course, back then the comic would have come out in single issues and told of its author’s miserable romantic life and dead-end job. In that sense Mid-Life is like checking in on one of those authors fifteen years on, so that now his miserable avatar is juggling two grown kids from a first failed marriage, an infant from a new second marriage, and a burgeoning crush on a children’s-music singer.

So far I probably sound rather negative. The truth is that Mid-Life does many things well. It devotes a fair amount of space to the children’s singer herself, and she’s an interesting character, trying to figure out whether she should abandon her dreams of being a serious musician once and for all to put on the golden handcuffs of a cable-network kids’ show. And Ollmann manages to infuse a lot of originality into the details of his protagonist’s mid-life crisis, even if the broad outlines are familiar.

PDF preview here.

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